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Inside Classics
" In utter loneliness a writer tries to explain the inexplicable."
John Steinbeck

At Penguin Classics our mission has always been to make the best books ever written available to everyone. And that also means constantly redefining and refreshing exactly what makes a ‘classic’.

That’s where Modern Classics come in. Since 1961 they have been an organic, ever-growing and ever-evolving list of books that we believe will continue to be read over and over again.

Now available

Understanding a Photograph

by John Berger

John Berger's writings on photography are some of the most original of the twentieth century. This selection contains many groundbreaking essays and previously uncollected pieces.
>>read more

 

An Essay on Typography

by Eric Gill

This is one of a number of pivotal works by creative thinkers whose writings on art, design and the media have changed our vision for ever.
>>read more

The Outsider

by Albert Camus

This new translation, by Sandra Smith, sensitively renders the subtleties and dreamlike atmosphere of The Outsider.
>>read more

 

Wallace Stegner: Collected Stories

by Wallace Stegner

These thirty-one stories demonstrate why Stegner is acclaimed as one of America's master storytellers.
>>read more

The Night Manager

by John le Carre

In a chilling tale of corrupt intelligence agencies, billion-dollar price tags and the truth of the brutal arms trade, John le Carre creates a claustrophobic world in which no one can be trusted.
>>read more

 

Babette's Feast and Other Stories

by Isak Dinesen

These five rich, witty and magical stories from the author of Out of Africa  include one of her most well-known tales, Babette's Feast,  which was made into the classic film.
>>read more


also available

An Accomodating Spouse

by Elizabeth Jolley

This is vintage Jolley, filled with quiet wit and keen observations of human relationships and their frailties.
>>read more

 

Adam's Bride

by Elizabeth Jolley

This masterly story from Woman in a Lampshade perfectly displays Elizabeth Jolley's remarkable talent for character and story.
>>read more

Mr. Scobie's Riddle

by Elizabeth Jolley

This bleakly comic investigation of old age, exile and displacement shows Elizabeth Jolley at her finest.  It is written with wry humour, melancholy and great warmth.

>>read more

Cabin Fever

by Elizabeth Jolley

Elizabeth Jolley writes lucidly of betrayal and survival, loneliness and desire, and with compassion for the sad dislocations of love between parents and children...

>>read more

The Georges' Wife

by Elizabeth Jolley

Vera and Mr George have made a new life together but Vera's thoughts return again and again to loves and lovers, meetings and partings - the voices that echo in the mind like music.

>>read more

The Well

by Elizabeth Jolley

A twentieth-century Australian classic, The Well is a haunting and wryly humorous tale of memory, desire and loneliness.

>>read more

Bastard Out of Carolina

by Dorothy Allison

Carolina in the 1950s, and Bone - christened Ruth Anna Boatwright - lives a happy life, in and out of her aunt's houses, playing with her cousins on the porch, sipping ice tea, loving her little sister Reece and her beautiful young mother.

>>read more

 

Parade's End

by Ford Madox Ford

Ford's masterly story of destruction and regeneration follows the progress of Christopher Tietjens as his world is shattered by the Great War.
>>read more

The Pursued

by C. S. Forester

C. S. Forester's 1935 thriller The Pursued, lost for decades, rewrote the traditions of crime fiction to create a dark, twisted portrayal of obsession and retribution.

>>read more

 

Fever Pitch

by Nick Hornby

In this hilarious, moving and now-classic book, he vividly depicts his childhood life, his time as a teacher, and his first loves (after football), all through the prism of the game, as he insightfully and brilliantly explores obsession, and the way it can shape a life.

>>read more

A Heart so White

by Javier Marias

'Marías' challenging and seductive technique reaches its pinnacle in A Heart So White.' The New York Times
>>read more

 

The Man of Feeling

by Javier Marias

The Man of Feeling is the haunting story of the birth and death of a passion, told in retrospect. Intricately interweaving desire and memory, it explores the nature of love, and asks whether we can ever truly recall something that no longer exists.

>>read more

Tomorrow in the Battle Think on Me

by Javier Marias

Víctor, a ghostwriter, is just about to have an affair with Marta, a married woman, when - in the bedroom, half-undressed - she drops dead in his arms. He panics and slips away.

>>read more

 

The Penitent

by Isaac Bashevis Singer

The Penitent is the story of Joseph Shapiro, a disillusioned and aimless man who discovers a purpose to his life through the Jewish faith.

>>read more

King of the Fields

by Isaac Bashevis Singer

A fictional exploration of primitive history, Singer's novel portrays an era of superstition and violence in a country emerging from the darkness of savagery.

>>read more

 

Love and Exile
by Isaac Bashevis Singer

From pre-First World War Warsaw to the New York of the 1930s, Isaac Bashevis Singer traces the early years of his life in this autobiographical trilogy.

>>read more

The Life of Right Reverend Ronald Knox

by Evelyn Waugh

Ronald Knox - priest, classicist and brilliant, prolific writer - was one of the outstanding men of letters of his time.

>>read more

 

Miami Blues

by Charles Willeford

Ex-con Freddy 'Junior' Frenger lands in Miami with three stolen wallets and plans for a new life of crime, and leaves the airport with a snatched suitcase and the corpse of a Hare Krishna behind him.

>>read more

The Way We Die Now

by Charles Willeford

Sergeant Hoke Mosely is struggling: his division chief is making ominous plans for him, a man he sent to jail for murder has moved in across the street, and he's stuck on one of his toughest cold cases yet.

>>read more

 

Sideswipe

by Charles Willeford

'Better than Hall and Hiaasen and as good as Elmore Leonard at his best.' Time Out

>>read more

New Hope for the Dead

by Charles Willeford

In an expensive Miami neighbourhood, Sergeant Hoke Moseley, Homicide Division, is called to investigate the lethal overdose of a young junkie.

>>read more

 

   

 


Essential Boxed Gift Sets

         

The Essential Steinbeck Boxed Set: Cannery Row, East of Eden, The Grapes

of Wrath, Of Mice and Men

The Essential Orwell Boxed Set: Animal Farm, Down and Out in Paris and London, 1984, Shooting an Elephant & Other Essays The Essential Camus Boxed Set: The Myth of Sisyphus, The Outsider, The Plague, The Rebel The Essential Fitzgerald Boxed Set: The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, This Side of Paradise, Tender is the Night The Essential Kafka Boxed Set: The Castle, Metamorphosis & Other Stories, The Trial

 

 

Penguin Modern Classics introduces Hubert Selby Jr.



'Selby's place is in the front rank of American novelists' - The New York Times

'Last Exit to Brooklyn will explode like a rusty hellish bombshell over America, and still be eagerly read in 100 years' - Allen Ginsberg

 

The Demon
by Hubert Selby Jr.
Last Exit to Brooklyn
by Hubert Selby Jr.

With a new Introduction by Irvine Welsh


The Room

by Hubert Selby Jr.

Harry White's rise to a position of unprecedented influence in a New York investment firm seems inevitable to those who know him. But with every achievement the
desire to destroy what is his grows stronger.
A demon within drives him to sexual excess, petty crime and eventually murder.

Few novels have caused as much controversy as Hubert Selby Jr.'s notorious masterpiece. Described by various reviewers as hellish
and obscene, it tells the stories of
New Yorkers who at every turn confront the worst excesses in human nature.

'It is quite an experience to be locked up all by yourself in any size room,' says the anonymous narrator of Hubert Selby Jr.'s second novel. This sequel to Last Exit to Brooklyn, is a shocking examination of the suffering humans can inflict on each other.

 

previous releases

Riverside Villas Murder

by Kingsley Amis

A mummy is stolen from a small-town museum and a soaking wet man collapses in fourteen-year-old Peter Furneaux's living room bleeding from the head, as a suspected student prank becomes a murder.

>>read more

 

I Want It Now

by Kingsley Amis

With his unerring eye for absurdity and class satire Kingsley Amis shows us what happens when money meets naked ambition.

>>read more

The Anti-Death League

by Kingsley Amis

In this surreal comedy of soldiers and spies, Lieutenant James Churchill and his colleagues find themselves questioning their purpose.

>>read more

 

The Folks That Live On The Hill

by Kingsley Amis

Harry Caldecote endures misplaced seductions, swindles and aggressive dogs just to keep the peace at the King's pub in Shepherd's Hill.

>>read more

       

Penguin Modern Classics remain the very best, most provocative, exciting, groundbreaking, inspiring, revolutionary works of the last 100 years – an organic, ever-growing and ever-evolving list of books that we believe will continue to be read by generation after generation.

To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the series we've released fifty mini Modern Classics full of the best short fiction by the greatest writers of the last 100 years (or so). Each book is a quick literary hit and satisfying shot of storytelling. They don't take long to read, but they will resonate with you long after you turn the final page. See them all here.


New Maps of Hell

by Kingsley Amis

In this hilarious, inspiring and provocative series of essays, Kingsley Amis introduces every reader to the wonders and value of science fiction writing.

>>read more

 

L'Abbé C

by Georges Bataille

A shocking, unnerving narrative about the intense and terrifying relationship between twin brothers.

>>read more

My Mother, Madame Edwarda, The Dead Man

by Georges Bataille

In these three works of erotic prose Georges Bataille fuses sex and spirituality in a highly personal and philosophical vision of the self.

>>read more

 

Literature and Evil

by Georges Bataille

A collection of essays, arguing that only by acknowledging its complicity with the knowledge of evil can literature communicate fully and intensely.

>>read more

A Day in the Life of a Smiling Woman: The Collected Stories

by Margaret Drabble

In these three works of erotic prose Georges Bataille fuses sex and spirituality in a highly personal and philosophical vision of the self.

>>read more

 

The Magician of Lublin
by Isaac Bashevis Singer

A collection of essays, arguing that only by acknowledging its complicity with the knowledge of evil can literature communicate fully and intensely.

>>read more

Enemies: A Love Story

by Isaac Bashevis Singer

' Isaac Bashevis Singer is a rare pleasure . . . a literary genius.' San Francisco Chronicle

>>read more

 

The Slave

by Isaac Bashevis Singer

In The Slave, published in 1962, Isaac Bashevis Singer creates a dreamlike portrayal of isolation, rejection, love and the meaning of sacrifice. 

>>read more

Collected Stories

by Isaac Bashevis Singer

This collection of forty-seven short stories, selected by Singer himself from across the whole of his career, brings together the best of his writing .

>>read more

 

Jules et Jim

by Henri-Pierre Roche

'A perfect hymn to love and perhaps to life' -
François Truffaut

>>read more

The Devil in the Flesh

byRaymond Radiguet

Written in spare, haunting prose when Raymond Radiguet was still a teenager, this semi-autobiographical novel became an instant bestseller and its author was hailed as a genius, before dying tragically at the age of twenty.

>>read more

 

The Golden Apples

by Eudora Welty

An acutely observed, richly atmospheric portrayal of small-town life in Morgana, Mississippi.

>>read more

Ending Up

by Kingsley Amis

'A genuine comic writer, probably the best after P. G. Wodehouse'  - John Mortimer

>>read more

 

Complete Stories

by Kingsley Amis

This definitive collection gathers all Amis's short fiction in a single volume for the first time and encompasses five decades of storytelling.

>>read more

The Spy Who Came in from the Cold

by John le Carré

In le Carré's breakthrough work of 1963, the spy story is reborn as a gritty and terrible tale of men who are caught up in politics beyond their imagining.

>>read more

 

The Secret Pilgrim

by John le Carré

 

In this final Smiley novel, the great spy gives his own humane and unexpected answers.

>>read more

The Russia House

by John le Carré

In his first post-glasnost spy novel, le Carré captures the effect of a slow and uncertain thaw on ordinary people and on the shadowy puppet-masters who command them .

>>read more

 

A Murder of Quality

by John le Carré

In his second George Smiley novel, le Carré moves outside the world of espionage to reveal the secrets at the heart of another particularly English institution. The result is a pitch-perfect murder mystery, with Smiley as master detective.

>>read more

The Perfect Murder: The First Inspector Ghote Mystery

by H.R.F. Keating

The Perfect Murder introduced Inspector Ghote: Bombay CID's most dogged, dutiful officer, and one of the greatest, most engaging creations in all detective fiction

>>read more

 

Under a Monsoon Cloud: An Inspector Ghote Mystery

by H.R.F. Keating

A man is dead and Inspector Ghote knows exactly who killed him. Now if he can just keep it a secret...
>>read more

Inspector Ghote Breaks an Egg: An Inspector Ghote Mystery

by H.R.F. Keating

In a small, provincial town in the heart of India, a politician's wife died under suspicious circumstances.

>>read more

 

Inspector Ghote Trusts the Heart

by H.R.F. Keating

Some crooks have tried to snatch the plump son of a business tycoon, and have accidentally made off with his playmate instead.
>>read more

The Tunnel

by Ernesto Sabato

'An existentialist classic . . . Retains a chilling, memorable power' 
New York Times Book Review

>>read more

Joke and Its Relation to the Unconscious
by Sigmund Freud

Jokes, Freud argues, provide immense pleasure by allowing us to express many of our deepest sexual, aggressive and cynical thoughts and feelings which would otherwise remain repressed.
>>read more

Someone Like You

by Roald Dahl

These eighteen tales of the macabre show Dahl's dark brilliance as a short story writer.
>>read more

 

Over to You: Ten Stories of Flyers and Flying

by Roald Dahl

These tales that draw on his Roald Dahl's war experiences.
>>read more

 

The Divided Self

by R. D. Laing

First published in 1960, this watershed work aimed to make madness comprehensible.

>>read more

 

Aloft

by William Langewiesche

Langewiesche considers how flying has altered not only how we move about the earth, but also how we view our world.

>>read more

 

Paul Bowles: Collected Stories

by Paul Bowles

Hauntingly beautiful stories of abandonment, vengeance, and extreme situations lead to disturbing conclusions.

>>read more

 

The Spider's House

by Paul Bowles

Fez, 1954, and American ex-pat Stenham reluctantly accepts a guide for his night-time walk home through the streets of the Medina.
>>read more

 

Up Above the World

by Paul Bowles

Up Above the World shows Paul Bowles to be a master of the tension and horror of rising viciousness.
>>read more

 

Let it Come Down

by Paul Bowles

This dark terrifying novel is arguably Bowles' greatest achievement.
>>read more

 

The Graduate

by Charles Webb


Told with wry, deadpan humour, this brilliant anti-establishment fable was the basis for Mike Nicholas' acclaimed film starring Dustin Hoffman.
>>read more

 

Man's Fate

by Andre Malraux

Shanghai, 1927, and revolution is in the air. As the city becomes caught up in violence and bloodshed, four people's lives are altered inexorably. .

>>read more

 

Heroes in the Wind: From Kull to Conan

by Robert E. Howard

This is writing as sheer, relentless excitement, from the grandmaster of pulp fiction.

>>read more

 

Interzone

by William S. Burroughs

Interzone shows the evolution of William Burroughs from the terse, fiercely confessional writer of Junky to the wild, brutal fantasist of Naked Lunch.

>>read more

 

Letters 1945-59

by William S. Burroughs

These letters track Burroughs' turbulent journey across three continents and two decades.
>>read more

 

My Education

by William S. Burroughs

My Education is intense, vivid, wry and laconic – and a revealing journey into the mind of a great writer.
>>read more

 

The Cat Inside

by William S. Burroughs

There is an unexpected side to William Burroughs – the author of weird and disturbing fictions had a great fondness for cats.

>>read more

 

The Hustler

by Walter Tevis

The inspiration for the legendary Paul Newman film, Walter Tevis's novel is a hardboiled tale of a beautiful talent for life in smoky poolrooms.

>>read more

 

The Man Who Fell to Earth

by Walter Tevis



The Man Who Fell to Earth is a science-fiction classic – a sad, thoughtful allegory of mistrust and sacrifice.
>>read more

 

Styles of Radical Will

by Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag's second collection of groundbreaking essays contains some of the most important pieces of criticism of the twentieth century.

>>read more

 

Against Interpretation and Other Essays

by Susan Sontag

Against Interpretation was Susan Sontag's first collection of essays and made her name as one of the most incisive thinkers of our time.

>>read more

 

Death Kit

by Susan Sontag

Dalton 'Diddy' Harron, thirty-three, divorced and mild-mannered, works in advertising for a microscope manufacturer and feels his life is running down.

>>read more

 

Under the Sign of Saturn

by Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag's third essay collection brings together her most important critical writing from 1972 to 1980.

>>read more

 

In America

by Susan Sontag

It is 1876 and Poland's greatest actress, Maryna Zalezowska, is setting off for the new world. At thirty-five she has decided to start a new life.
>>read more

 

The Volcano Lover

by Susan Sontag

The British Ambassador at the court of Naples has only two passions – his precious art collection, and his fascination with volcanoes – until he agrees to care for his nephew's discarded mistress.

>>read more

 

Where the Stress Falls

by Susan Sontag

Susan Sontag – pioneering essayist, cultural critic and radical thinker – brought together over forty pieces from across the arc of her writing career in this landmark collection of non-fiction works.

>>read more

 

Homage to Catalonia

by George Orwell

'An unrivalled picture of the rumors, suspicions and treachery of civil war' - Antony Beevor

>>read more

Down and Out in Paris and London

by George Orwell

Orwell's vivid memoir of his time living among the desperately poor and destitute is a moving tour of the underworld society.

>>read more

 

Why Read the Classics?

by Italo Calvino

An elegant defence of the value of great literature by one of the finest authors of the last century.

>>read more

 

Numbers in the Dark

by Italo Calvino


A collection of short stories covering the length of Italo Calvino's extraordinary writing career, from when he was a teenager to shortly before his death.

>>read more

Under the Jaguar Sun

by Italo Calvino

A couple on an epicurean journey across Mexico are excited by the idea of a particular ingredient, suggested by ancient rituals of human sacrifice.

>>read more

 

The Path to the Spiders' Nests

by Italo Calvino

Published in 1947, Italo Calvino's first novel remains startling, and the 1964 preface is his most brilliant piece of literary self-examination.

>>read more

 

Fantastic Tales

ed by Italo Calvino

This collection is a brilliant précis of the work of a great writer whose legacy will endure through the millennium he addressed.
>>read more

 

Six Memos for the Next Millennium

by Italo Calvino

From tales of fabulous enchantments and supernatural horror to subtler, more psychological terrors, the best of nineteenth-century fantastic literature is collected here by Italo Calvino.
>>read more

 

The Road to San Giovanni

by Italo Calvino

These five autobiographical essays  are fascinating expeditions through the memories of one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century.

>>read more

 

Tarka the Otter

by Henry Williamson

Tarka the Otter depicts a fierce struggle for survival in the wild that also carries echoes of the author's experiences of the First World War.

>>read more

Uncommon Danger

by Eric Ambler

When Kenton travels to Nuremberg to investigate a story about a top-level meeting of Nazi officials, he inadvertently finds himself on a train bound for Austria after a bad night of gambling and stranded with no money.
>>read more

 

The Mask of Dimitrios

by Eric Ambler

English crime novelist Charles Latimer is travelling in Istanbul when he makes the acquaintance of Turkish police inspector Colonel Haki.
>>read more

 

 

Epitaph for a Spy

by Eric Ambler

A chilling psychological thriller and one of the greatest post-apocalyptic novels ever written.
>>read more

 

 

Cause for Alarm

by Eric Ambler

Nicky Marlow needs a job. He's engaged to be married and the employment market in Britain in 1937 is pretty slim.
>>read more

 

Journey into Fear

by Eric Ambler

It is 1940 and Mr Graham, a quietly-spoken engineer and arms expert, has just finished high-level talks with the Turkish government. And now somebody wants him dead.

>>read more

 

The Death of Grass

by John Christopher

When a deadly disease hits Britain, society starts to descend into barbarism. As John and his family try to make it across country to the safety of his brother's farm in a hidden valley, their humanity is tested to its very limits.
>>read more

 

 

The Shiralee

by D'Arcy Niland

A shiralee is a swag, a burden, a bloody millstone – and that's what four-year-old Buster is to her father, Macauley. 

>>read more

 

The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love

by Oscar Hijuelos

In 1949 two young Cuban musicians, brothers Cesar and Nestor, leave Havana for New York.  By day they work hard, by night they are the Mambo Kings.

>>read more

   

 

A View from the Bridge

by Arthur Miller

Eddie Carbone is a longshoreman and a straightforward man, with a strong sense of decency and of honour.

>>read more

 

All My Sons

by Arthur Miller

In Joe and Kate Keller's family garden, an apple tree – a memorial to their son Larry, lost in the Second World War – has been torn down by a storm.

>>read more

 

Incident at Vichy

by Arthur Miller

In Vichy France, 1942, a group of Jewish men sit outside an office, waiting to be interviewed.

>>read more

 

After the Fall

by Arthur Miller

After the Fall is often seen as the most explicitly autobiographical of Arthur Miller's plays, and Maggie as an unflinching portrait of Miller's ex-wife Marilyn Monroe, only two years after her suicide.

>>read more

 

Baby Doll and Other Plays

by Tennessee Williams

Tennessee Williams's controversial Hollywood screenplay Baby Doll opens with Archie Lee's teenage bride driving him to distraction.
>>read more

 

The Glass Menagerie

by Tennessee Williams

Abandoned by her husband, Amanda Wingfield comforts herself with recollections of her earlier, more gracious life in Blue Mountain when she was pursued by 'gentleman callers'. 
>>read more

 

Brideshead Revisited

by Evelyn Waugh

The most nostalgic and reflective of Evelyn Waugh's novels, Brideshead Revisited looks back to the golden age before the Second World War.
>>read more

 

Make Room! Make Room!

by Harry Harrison

Written in 1966 and made into the science-fiction film Soylent Green, this is a witty and unnerving story about stretching the earth's resources, and the human spirit, to breaking point.

>>read more

 

The Town and the City

by Jack Kerouac


The Town and the City marked the first true literary impact of the founding father of the Beat Generation.
>>read more

 

Allen Ginsberg: Collected Poems

by Allen Ginsberg

Ginsberg, as chief figure among the Beats, was at the centre of a social and political revolution, yet his groundbreaking verse also changed the course of American poetry.

>>read more

 

Howl, Kaddish and Other Poems

by Allen Ginsberg

Beat movement icon and visionary poet, Allen Ginsberg broke boundaries with his fearless, pyrotechnic verse.

>>read more 

London Belongs to Me

by Norman Collins

It is 1938 and the prospect of war hangs over every London inhabitant.  But the city doesn't stop. 

>>read more

 

The Flood

by J. M .G. Le Clezio

François Besson listens to a tape recording of a girl contemplating suicide. Drifting through the days in a provincial city, his thoughts eventually lead to violence.

>>read more

 

Terra Amata

by J. M .G. Le Clezio

For Chancelade, the world is teeming with beauty, wonder and possibilities, he relishes the most minute details of his physical surroundings.

>>read more

Fever

by J. M .G. Le Clezio

Set in a timeless, spaceless universe, these experimental and haunting works portray the landscape of the human consciousness with dazzling verbal dexterity and power.

>>read more

The Harp in the South Novels

by Ruth Park

 

Three of Ruth Park's best loved books – Missus, The Harp in the South and Poor Man's Orange – are brought together in this volume, tracing the saga of the Darcy family over thirty years.

>>read more

 

Junky

by William S. Burroughs

Burroughs' first novel, a largely autobiographical account of the constant cycle of drug dependency, cures and relapses, remains the most unflinching, unsentimental account of addiction ever written.

>>read more

 

The Wild Boys

by William S. Burroughs

A fragmentary, freewheeling novel, it sees wild boys engage in vigorous, ritualistic sex and drug taking.

>>read more

 

Exterminator!

by William S. Burroughs

The hallucinatory landscape of William Burroughs' compellingly bizarre, fragmented novel is constantly shifting, and something sinister is always just beneath the surface.

>>read more

 

The Job: Interviews with William S. Burroughs

by William S. Burroughs

William Burroughs' work was dedicated to an assault upon language, traditional values and all agents of control.

>>read more

 

The Yage Letters

by William S. Burroughs & Allen Ginsberg

This mix of travel writing, satire, psychedelia and epistolary novel - sees Burroughs journeying through South America, writing to his friend Allen Ginsberg.

>>read more

 

Child of All Nations

by Irmgard Keun

Because Kully's father has written the wrong things about his country, and because there might be a war coming her family can't go back to Germany. 
>>read more

 

Bonjour Tristesse & A Certain Smile

by Francoise Sagan

Published when she was only nineteen, Françoise Sagan's astonishing first novel became an instant bestseller.

>>read more

 

On Photography
by Susan Sontag

This groundbreaking critique of photography asks forceful questions about the moral and aesthetic issues surrounding the art form.

>>read more

Ways of Seeing

by John Berger

John Berger's Ways of Seeing changed the way people think about painting and art criticism. 
>>read more

 

The Medium is the Massage

by Marshall McLuhan & Quentin Fiore

 

Marshall McLuhan predicted the all-pervasive rise of the modern mass media.  Blending text, image and photography, this 1960s classic illustrates how the growth of technology utterly reshapes society.
>>read more

 

Design as Art

by Bruno Munari

Bruno Munari was among the most inspirational designers of all time, described by Picasso as 'the new Leonardo'.

>>read more

 

The Psychedelic Experience
by Timothy Leary

From Timothy Leary's first trip in Mexico in 1960, his life's work became exploring and preaching the benefits that psychedelic drugs had to offer.

>>read more

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Other Stories

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Full grown with a long, smoke-coloured beard, requiring the services of a cane and fonder of cigars than warm milk, Benjamin Button is a very curious baby indeed.

>>read more

Anthem

by Ayn Rand

Equality 7-2521 is a man apart. Since The Great Rebirth it has been a crime in his world to think or act as an individual.

>>read more

Hothouse

by Brian Aldiss

In a strange future, the few remaining humans are regularly consumed by savage greenery, and their only allies are the giant Termights.

>>read more

The Essential Groucho

ed by Stefan Kanfer

Groucho was the linchpin of the Marx Brothers, the brilliant comic act that emerged from New York to conquer the vaudeville circuit, Hollywood and then the world by the end of the 1920s.

>>read more

 

Journey Through a Small Planet

by Emanuel Litvinoff

Emanuel Litvinoff recalls his working class Jewish childhood in the East End of London.

>>read more

Siddhartha

by Hermann Hesse

Siddhartha, a handsome Brahmin's son, is clever and well loved, yet increasingly dissatisfied with the life that is expected of him. 

>>read more

Quantum of Solace: The Complete James Bond Short Stories

by Ian Fleming

 Inside this collection you'll find From a View to a Kill, For Your Eyes Only, Quantum of Solace, Risico, The Hildebrand Rarity, Octopussy, The Living Daylights, The Property of a Lady and 007 in New York.

>>read more

 

The Mortgaged Heart

by Carson McCullers

Few writers have expressed the search for love and the need for human understanding with such power and poetic sensibility as Carson McCullers.

>>read more

 

Steppenwolf

by Hermann Hesse

Harry Haller is the Steppenwolf: wild, strange, shy and alienated from society. His dispair and desire for death draw him into a dark, enchanted underworld.

>>read more

 

The Glass Arena

by John Healy

John Healy, the son of poor Irish immigrants in London, grows up hardened by violence and soon finds himself overwhelmed by alcoholism.

>>read more

 

On the Road: the Original Scroll

by Jack Kerouac

On the Road: the Original Scroll is the first ever paperback publication of Kerouac's original draft for the book – transcribed from the famous 'scroll': hundreds of typed pages which constitute the manuscript taped together by Kerouac himself.

>>read more

 

Robert Graves: Complete Short Stories

by Robert Graves

On the themes of love and war, myth and history, these pieces illustrate the brilliance of Robert Graves in the short-story form.

>>read more

 

On the Road

by Jack Kerouac


The novel that defined the 'Beat' generation and became the bible of the counter culture.

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The Bodysurfers

by Robert Drewe

Set among the surf and sandhills of the Australian beach - and the tidal changes of three generations of the Lang family - this bestselling collection of short stories is an Australian classic.

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South From Granada

by Gerald Brenan

Between 1920 and 1934, Gerald Brenan lived in the remote Spanish village of Yegen and South of Granada depicts his time there, vividly evoking the essence of his rural surroundings and the Spanish way of life before the Civil War.

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The Merry-Go-Round In The Sea

by Randolph Stow

In 1941, Rob Coram is six. The war feels far removed from his world of aunties and cousins and the beautiful, dry landscape of Geraldton in Western Australia. But when his favourite, older cousin, Rick, leaves to join the army, the war takes a step closer.

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Cat's Cradle

by Kurt Vonnegut

Told with deadpan humour and bitter irony, Kurt Vonnegut's cult tale of global destruction preys on our deepest fears of witnessing Armageddon and, worse still, surviving it ...

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The Children's Bach

by Helen Garner

Athena and Dexter lead an enclosed family life, innocent of fashion and bound towards a disturbed child.

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Honour & Other People's Children

by Helen Garner

Helen Garner examines the idiosyncratic and bothersome notions of honour by which her characters - adults and children - shape their untidy lives.

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A Tranquil Star: Unpublished Stories

by Primo Levi

This landmark selection of seventeen short stories, translated into English for the first time, opens up a world of wonder, love, cruelty and curious twists of fate.

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The Great Railway Bazaar: By Train Through Asia

by Paul Theroux

Paul Theroux's epic journey by rail through India and Asia where he encounters a huge variety of places and people, food, faiths and cultures.

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The Old Patagonian Express: By Train Through the Americas

by Paul Theroux

Beginning his journey in Boston, Paul Theroux tells of his voyage from ice-bound Massachusetts and Illinois to the arid plateau of Argentina's most southerly tip.

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My Father's Moon

by Elizabeth Jolley

One of Elizabeth Jolley's finest novels, full of alarming perceptions, black irony and tenderness. It is a remarkable achievement.

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Cabin Fever

by Elizabeth Jolley

Vera has cabin fever. Confined with her thoughts in the concrete tower of a New York hotel, she is haunted by her mother's reminders of what she should have been.

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The Georges' Wife

by Elizabeth Jolley

Vera and Mr George have made a new life together but Vera's thoughts return again and again to loves and lovers, meetings and partings.

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Marry Me

by John Updike

Over a summer of snatched weekends, furtive phone calls and illicit trysts under the hot sun at Connecticut beach, Sally and Jerry begin a passionate affair.

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The Assistant

by Robert Walser

Robert Walser claimed to have written The Assistant, a semi-autobiographical work, in just six weeks as an entry for a literary competition. The second of his few surviving novels, it is now regarded as major work of modernist literature.

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Clock Without Hands

by Carson McCullers

In a small town in the American South, four men, young and old, consider their pasts and their futures.

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The Victim

by Saul Bellow

While his wife is away visiting her mother, Leventhal feels lost and alone. One evening, seeking relief from the New York heat wave, he is accosted in a park near his apartment by a seedy-looking drunk.

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The Actual

by Saul Bellow

Harry Trellman, an ageing, astute Chicago businessman, has never really belonged anywhere. His human attachments, life everything else in his life, are singular and irregular.

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Ravelstein

by Saul Bellow

A tale of philosophy, love, mortality, vaudeville routines and $4,500 suits ensues as two old rogues come to scrutinize their very existence.

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To Jerusalem and Back

by Saul Bellow

In the mid-1970s, Saul Bellow visited Israel and this is his account of his time there.

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The Dean's December

by Saul Bellow

Albert Corde, dean of a Chicago college, is unprepared for the violent response to his scathing articles on city corruption and his involvement in the trial of two black people charged with killing a white student.

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The Empty Space

by Peter Brook

Passionate, unconventional and fascinating, this book shows how theatre defies rules, builds and shatters illusions and creates lasting memories for its audiences.

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The Theory of the Modern Stage

ed by Eric Bentley

Eric Bentley, brings together landmark writings by dramatists, directors and thinkers who have had a profound effect on the theatre since the mid nineteenth century.

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Monkey Grip

by Helen Garner

Inner-suburban Melbourne in the 1970s: a world of communal living, drugs, music and love. A lyrical and gritty first novel that deserves its place as a classic of Australian literature.

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Postcards from Surfers

by Helen Garner

Eleven stories about the complexities of live and love; of looking back and longing; of what it means to be a stranger, on foreign ground and known.

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Science Fiction Omnibus

by Brian Aldiss

This new edition of Brian Aldiss's classic anthology brings together a diverse selection of science fiction spanning over sixty years.

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POPism

by Andy Warhol and Pat Hackett

A cultural storm swept through the 1960s – Pop Art, Bob Dylan, psychedelia, underground movies – and at its centre sat a bemused young artist with silver hair: Andy Warhol.

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Love in a Fallen City: And Other Stories

by Eileen Chang

Eileen Chang is one of the great writers of twentieth-century China, where she enjoys a passionate following both on the mainland and in Taiwan. At the heart of Chang's achievement is her short fiction.

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Herzog

by Saul Bellow

Is Moses Herzog losing his mind? His formidable wife Madeleine has left him for his best friend and he is left alone with his whirling thoughts.

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The Adventures of Augie March

by Saul Bellow

A penniless and parentless Chicago boy growing up in the Great Depression, Augie March drifts through life latching on to a wild succession of occupations.

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Henderson the Rain King

by Saul Bellow

A hilarious, often ribald story, Henderson the Rain King is also a profound look at the forces that drive a man through life.

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Mr Sammler's Planet

by Saul Bellow

Mr. Artur Sammler, Holocaust survivor, intellectual, and occasional lecturer at Columbia University in 1960s New York City, is a "registrar of madness," a refined and civilized being caught among crazy people.

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It All Adds Up

by Saul Bellow

Saul Bellow's fiction, honoured by a Nobel Prize and a Pulitzer, among other awards, has made him a literary giant.

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The Lucky Country

by Donald Horne

The phrase 'the lucky country' has become part of our lexicon; it's forever being invoked in debates about the Australian way of life, but is all too often misused by those blind to Horne's irony.

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Memoirs

by Tennassee Williams

When Memoirs was first published in 1975, it created quite a bit of turbulence in the media – though long self-identified as a gay man, Williams' candour about his love life, sexual encounters, and drug use was found shocking.

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The Feminine Mystique

by Betty Friedan

This groundbreaking and life-changing work remains just as powerful, important and true as it was forty-five years ago.

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Love in the Time of Cholera

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Florentino Ariza has never forgotten his first love. He has waited nearly a lifetime in silence since his beloved Fermina married another man.

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One Hundred Years of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Gabriel Garcia Marquez's great masterpiece is the story of seven generations of the Buenedia family and of Mocondo, the town they have built.

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All The King's Men

by Robert Penn Warren

All the King's Men is considered the finest novel ever written on American politics.

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The Centaur

by John Updike

In a small Pennsylvania town in the late 1940s, schoolteacher George Caldwell yearns to find some meaning in his life.

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Of The Farm

by John Updike

Joey Robinson is a thirty-live-year-old advertising consultant working in the urban jungle of Manhattan. One day, Joey decides to return to the farm where he grew up, and where his mother still lives.

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Humboldt's Gift

by Saul Bellow

For many years, the great poet Von Humboldt Fleisher and Charlie Citrine, a young man inflamed with a love for literature, were the best of friends.
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Dangling Man

by Saul Bellow  

This is the story of Moses Herzog, a great sufferer, joker, mourner and charmer. Although his life steadily disintegrates around him Herzog sees himself as a survivor.

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Collected Stories

by Saul Bellow  

This is the definitive collection of short stories by Saul Bellow. Abundant, precise, various, rich and exuberant, the stories display the stylistic and emotional brilliance.
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More Die of Heartbreak

by Saul Bellow 

Kenneth Trachtenberg has left his native Paris for the Midwest. He has come to be near his beloved uncle, the world-renowned botanist Benn Crader, self-described 'plant visionary.'
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Seize the Day

by Saul Bellow   

In the course of one climatic day Tommy reviews his past mistakes and spiritual malaise, until a mysterious, philosophizing con man grants him a glorious, illuminating moment of truth and understanding, and offers him one last hope...
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